Posts Tagged ‘Preventive action’

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Let’s be honest, nobody likes to receive a Corrective Action Report. Whoever is on the receiving end more than likely takes it personally and probably finds every reason under the sun to get out of taking responsibility for it and taking action to sort it. So, begins another day in the life of a QA man.

I see this all too often so hit on the option that is so simple if you are really facing this where ever you work – just give the form a different name!

We are all told when we undergo our auditor training that wonderful acronym of – Audits Uncover Defects In The System – so we should promote that on this occasion. Why not try a System Deficiency Note which trips off the tongue nicely as an SDN? In addition you could consider using System Enhancement Note for the PARs – but you’ll have to be quick to get any mileage out of that I guess 🙂 If you haven’t heard it is removed in the 2015 version, although I still think it can serve a purpose when recording action to mitigate ‘risk’.

I am sure many of you have already come to the same conclusion so share how you have retitled your CARs. Remember you can get more support in the form of training, the free App, virtual mentoring and videos by clicking through to the 9001 Support Centre.

ps: You can of course use the idea in any management system, not just quality.

 

 

 

 

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Anybody going around a company performing a quality audit might be forgiven for thinking such issues lie within the 18001 health and safety scheme – but think again.  It beholds us all not to disregard a situation that impacts adversely on employees health and safety within the workplace.

Now this goes beyond the statutory (law as on the statute books) and regulatory (as required by an organisation) stipulations in 9001 which are there in relation to the product or service being provided.  For example, producing vehicles need you to comply with all the relevant requirements to get a vehicle on the road such as MOTs, Road Tax and perhaps Certificates of Compliance dependent upon where the vehicle originated.

However, if on walking around the workshop as you conduct your audit ( assuming you do get out of the office of course ) you spot a set of jacks or ramps with a vehicle hosted in the air but clearly in a more than precarious position you are at liberty to bring it the attention of the site representative.

How about walking around a paint spray shop full of paint and vapours only to find an unprotected oxy-acetylene welding rig bang ( sorry ) in the middle of it all; bar stock in racks with the heaviest stored at the top instead of the bottom or the FLT driver lifting these down by balancing them on the forks because they don’t use pans on the racks; a dirty and noisy shop floor where operators have no option but to eat their snap ( sorry, food for those south of Birmingham) by their machines because there are no canteen facilities or a work space where heavy components have to be hand carried because of the lack of lifting tackle. Now, these may seem far-fetched and I’d agree except for the fact I have seen them! I’m sure you can think of others.

So, even though it doesn’t sit formally inside your audit, remember to raise such issues to be, literally, on the safe side. Imagine how you would feel if you walked away from site then the next day you heard of an accident related to what you witnessed the day before.  You have a duty as a quality professional and it is also another means of adding value to the audit.

ps: If you feel incomfortable because you haven’t got a definitive section of 9001 to lean on then why not suggest it as a preventive action?

One of the most confusing aspects for management representatives to get their heads round when taking on a quality system has to be the concept of Corrective, Preventative and Preventive action.  As they return weary eyed from their auditor course and laden with notes and forms they have to be clear which one to implement and when. I have recently had this conversation again with a client so thought it worth repeating here.

It’s here where we start

Corrective action is the one that invariably gets used first.  If you raise a non-conformance you tackle the one more often than not isolated product or service affected to get it resolved so the order can move forward.  If you raise a CAR on an audit then whatever sample you have viewed and taken as objective evidence to justify a CAR needs tackling.  Both these are immediate actions to stabilise the product, service or system.

Now system failures require you to prevent the problem recurring – it’s happened – but how do you ensure you are not faced with the same issue in the future.  That is the Preventative Action.  It might take a bit longer to both think of it, implement it and to test it remembering that you need something concrete to prove to yourself that it has worked.  It is worth adding that if your root cause analysis on your non-conformances reveals a recurring theme,and I recommend three occurrences over a short space of time here,  then you should move that issue onto a CAR as well because it is no longer an isolated instance.  There is no need for absolutely every non-conformance to lead to a CAR – unless of course the customer concerned demands it!

Don’t make this mistake

Just stating ‘staff to be retrained’ or ‘procedure to be changed’ or ‘additional data to be recorded’ isn’t sufficient on its own.  You need to be sure that changes have been implemented and followed so you need to use subsequent quality records as objective evidence. Perhaps in the above scenarios – a short test to demonstrate understanding; an audit on the problem area or a measure of the new data being recorded.  The other point to remember of course is that the action may fail to be effective in which case you need to start again and think of an alternative.

The missing piece

So where does Preventive Action come in?  The distinct difference here is that nothing has gone wrong with the product, service or system – yet!  However you have spotted a likelihood of failure unless you take action to prevent it.  So your inspectors are working OK but in dimly lit premises so you feel it is only a matter of time before their judgement is compromised so the lighting arrangements are reviewed; machinery or transport is overlooked and so struggling more and more to perform prompting for a maintenance schedule to be created or a member of staff is clearly unsure of a new process so you quickly arrange additional training.

It is a totally different situation hence it should have its own place  – and form of course – in the system.  All aspects of ISO 9001 are featured in the free ISO 9001 Training Guide videos with samples available by clicking the link.