Archive for the ‘ISO 9001’ Category

A lot of people miss out on the opportunity to reduce the control over processes based on the sound data they have collected. It is often said that the system shouldn’t stand still and this is no exception, so let’s consider goods inwards for example and the checking of documents, especially certificates.

You might start off checking every one as you know there are always issues with your suppliers. However, as you discuss the issues with them some respond and their performance improves. ( Clearly, if you are not talking to them then not much is going to change so you may have to take that on board first ).

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The risk is that you still check every one because ‘that’s what we have always done’. You are quite at liberty, based on the hard evidence of your data, to lower the rate of the checking to say 50% on the good ones and monitor to ensure all is still under control. PDCA in operation even! If performance starts to deteriorate, then revert back to 100% and so on.
You could end up with some who never give you a problem so you could reduce the check further to 10% or even zero, all of which releases resources to work on those who, let’s say, need a bit more encouragement. The thing to remember is that you are taking decisions backed by robust data you have collected and not on a whim. If you are not already adopting this approach, why not give it a try?
Such a key requirement hidden away within paragraph 9.3 – but so important to take on board when top management start to review performance. I often see a one dimensional statement regarding results from the year (or time period ) under review. However, a trend needs a timeline so always remember to compare your performance with say the previous one or two years. Is is improving, deteriorating or standing still?

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In addition, are you getting different reasons reported behind the numbers? Are the type of complaints the same? Are the same areas or product types affected? Are you seeing the same type of CARs? The list is there to be exploited so that you get a firm grip on what is changing within your QHSE management system.

Suppose I should end by restating the fact that you don’t actually need a ‘meeting’ as long as you review the elements and can evidence that this has happened. But you knew that already didn’t you . . . .

Check out this short trailer for a series of videos coming soon.

We all now need to be aware that strategic actions we take in business can impact on this group of people as stated in the upgraded ISO standards. A good example has been the development of, so called, SMART motorways across the UK, something you can identify with I’m sure.

CIP

These seemed to have been introduced without that much recourse to the views of motorists and now the RAC have reviewed them in their Motoring 2019 report and stated that 72 percent of motorists are worried about whether or not they would reach the refuge areas. Sadly, we already have reports of motorists that didn’t with fatal consequences.

Now I appreciate that this scenario may not fit the norm for a business planning to make strategic changes in how it operates, but the principle is the same. Consider the implications before making that decision.

As the report stated:
“We need to set the scene at the very start and communicate and consult with our customers, stakeholders or in this case the general public, especially if we want the initiative to be successful”.

Hopefully, the consequences where you work will not be as calamtous.

One tool that is perhaps more common in aerospace, automotive and the other high-end systems is the good old Turtle diagram. It is designed not only to give a visual link between your manual and procedures, but to set the criteria against which the process will be measured.

I have been preachig for many a year that your QMS can be the best written, best looking and best adopted that has ever been – but if it doesn’t ‘perform’ for the benefit of the business then what is the point? 

Check it out below and try and apply it to your key processes. You might suprise yourself – always remember as well that the metrics(s) should be realistic and agreed with the process owners.

Turtle

When you need this skill you have to usually decide who to visit for a few days. Well, I could come to you if you are in Yorkshire, The Midlands, Humberside or Derbyshire. Now there’s a thought. Simply click the picture to:

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It might just be what you have been looking for.

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I have uploaded a video that was taken when I presented this as a talk at the Sheffex Exhibition in Sheffield back in November 2017. I sincerely hope that most of you won’t have to read it because you will have transitioned or at least are on your way.

However, on top of the certification bodies telling me that at the end of 2017 some 25% hadn’t even started, I am now hearing of companies that are in that position plus certification bodies are running out of dates and auditors. You will see a brief summary of the benefits of 9001 but, as they didn’t start the recording at the start, you need to know that the three management styles I refer to at the beginning are:

headless chickens
blue a***d flies
and busy fools

What follows is a review of the new requirements and then a simple strategy to get you upgraded to the new 2015 version. Along the way you may also get the feeling that the technical gremlins were out in force as well – and you’d be right 🙂

Be good to hear feedback from as to your experience of the transition where you work and remember that there is more useful information at the iso 9001 support centre.

 

It is a very common occurrence when I go on site to conduct my Competent Auditor session that I get asked, “Well that’s OK, but what does an audit look like and what questions should I ask?” Taking that on board, my colleague Amanda and I are putting this video out to see what reaction it gets. Would it help you, your colleagues or your clients get a clearer picture of how they should go about an audit and how to handle the responses?

It is only the trailer as the full video lasts around 12 minutes which starts with a good audit then follows with the three reasons it fails – system inadequate, disregarded or needed

Please leave your comment below and I’ll send the full version to those of you who offer the most constructive feedback. PLEASE don’t get hung up on the actual content and interpretation as we all know each of us will probably approach it in our one unique way 🙂

Remember we are always here to help and support you in your 9001 work. See for yourself by clicking through to the 9001 Support Centre.

No, I don’t mean running around the office shouting your head off about who’s done what wrong!

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This is all about making sure that you classify your corrective actions into one of three groups to aid subsequent analysis. Now, I should add before going any further, that this is my bespoke way of dealing with this issue but I find it really effective. Here is the first category:

SD – System Disregarded

A minor CAR here as the procedure is fine and current but, for whatever reason, staff occasionally decide not to follow bits of it (as opposed to blatantly ignoring everything). Perhaps they are not signing off all the boxes; stamping a document or filling in some information. You need to do a really good root cause analysis to find out why of course.

SI – System Inadequate

Another minor CAR and the most common as it refers to the system being out of step with what is actually happening in the office or on the shop floor. Invariably it is when you see the procedures not outlining what exactly happens out there. In one sense it is a good thing because it shows the processes are being developed – it’s just that someone forgot to tell the Quality Manager to amend the procedure! What do you mean that never happens where you work!

SN – System Needed

This is the worst case and a major CAR because there just isn’t system that you can evidence. For example there is no audit schedule so nothing else can follow without that; there is no contract review of sales orders against customer purchase orders or no management reviews take place etc etc.

Well, I hope you like the sound of that and can see the benefit. By all means tell me how you dress this aspect of your system by commenting below and remember that more useful support can be found at http://www.iso9001supportcentre.com.

ps: Some exciting news coming soon on the 9001:2015 training video front soon.